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Table 2 Measurements of vitamin B6 status before and after 30 day treatment

From: Pyridoxine supplementation corrects vitamin B6 deficiency but does not improve inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

  Placebo group (n = 14) B6 group (n = 14) p value (baseline)a p value (treat)b
  Before After Before After   
Plasma PLP (nmol/l)c 22.8 (15.4–31.5) 23.6 (15.2–43.0) 27.0 (20.4–30.9) 144.5 (84.5–236.7) <0.0001 <0.0001
Erythrocyte PLP (nmol/l) 26.0 (20.8–39.4) 41.6 (28.5–53.7) 44.6 (37.5–54.0) 116.4 (65.3–424.7) 0.623 0.002
αEAST 1.88 (1.67–1.99) 1.85 (1.64–1.96) 1.80 (1.68–1.93) 1.33 (1.29–1.40) 0.001 <0.0001
ΔtHcy (μmol/l)c 19.2 (15.0–27.5) 17.9 (13.0–25.8) 24.9 (16.4–35.9) 19.0 (15.5–28.7) <0.0001 0.086
Post-load XA (μmol/24 h)c 173 (132–243) 137 (103–354) 183 (30–653) 102 (39–371) 0.001 0.042
4-PA (μg/24 h) 0.7 (0.5–1.2) 0.8 (0.5–170) 0.8 (0.5–2.0) 4.2 (0.8–12.8) 0.338 <0.0001
  1. Data are presented as median (95% CI). aEffects of each baseline (before treatment) value on its post-treatment outcome. bTreatment effects of placebo and vitamin B6 were examined by analysis of covariance after adjusting for baseline value. cPlasma pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), urinary xanthurenic acid excretion in response to a tryptophan load test (post-load XA), and plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations were log-transformed to reach normal distribution for statistical analyses. αEAST, erythrocyte aspartate aminotransferase activity coefficient; 4-PA, 24 h 4-pyridoxic acid excretion; ΔtHcy, net homocysteine increase in response to a methionine load test.