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Table 2 Relationship between vitamin C and vitamin E intake and knee structures

From: Effect of antioxidants on knee cartilage and bone in healthy, middle-aged subjects: a cross-sectional study

  Univariate analysis Multivariate analysis
  Regression coefficient (odds ratio (95% confidence interval)) P value Regression coefficient (odds ratio (95% confidence interval)) P value
Vitamin C     
   Cartilage volumea -41.9 (-173.2 to 89.4) 0.53 -60.8 (-147.9 to 26.3) 0.17
   Cartilage defectsb 1.03 (0.81–1.31) 0.82 1.02 (0.76–1.36) 0.90
   Bone areac -9.3 (-65.1 to 46.5) 0.74 -35.5 (-68.8 to -2.3) 0.04
   Bone marrow lesionsd 0.63 (0.40–0.99) 0.05 0.50 (0.29–0.87) 0.01
Vitamin E     
   Cartilage volume 186.5 (58.4–314.5) 0.004 57.3 (-37.8 to 152.4) 0.24
   Cartilage defects 0.96 (0.76–1.22) 0.74 1.00 (0.72–1.33) 0.89
   Bone area 73.8 (19.3–128.2) 0.01 27.0 (-9.6 to 63.6) 0.15
   Bone marrow lesions 1.10 (0.80–1.50) 0.56 1.10 (0.73–1.66) 0.66
  1. aChange in tibial cartilage volume (mm3) per standard-deviation increase in vitamin C/vitamin E intake before and after adjusting for energy intake, age, gender, body mass index, and tibial plateau bone area.
  2. bOdds ratio of tibiofemoral cartilage defects being present per standard-deviation increase in vitamin C/vitamin E intake before and after adjusting for energy intake, age, gender, body mass index, and tibial cartilage volume.
  3. cChange in tibial plateau bone area (mm2) per standard-deviation increase in vitamin C/vitamin E intake before and after adjusting for energy intake, age, gender, and body mass index.
  4. dOdds ratio of tibiofemoral bone marrow lesions being present per standard-deviation increase in vitamin C/vitamin E intake before and after adjusting for energy intake, age, gender, and body mass index.