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Table 1 Longitudinal treatment patterns according to primary treatment by specialist or PCP

From: Cluster analysis of longitudinal treatment patterns in patients newly diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus in the United States

Cluster Interpretation Treated primarily by specialistsa Treated primarily by PCPsa
   n % n %
1 Not actively treated throughout (<0.05 (mean) annual prescriptions) 216 26.2 815 64.6
2 CS only: high number of prescriptions (chronic use) 29 3.5 13 1.0
3 CS only: moderate number of prescriptions with slow reduction 85 10.3 92 7.3
4 HCQ only: high number of prescriptions (chronic use) 102 12.4 56 4.4
5 HCQ only: moderate number of prescriptions (chronic use) 136 16.5 134 10.6
6 HCQ only: poor adherence 111 13.5 67 5.3
7 CS plus HCQ: high number of prescriptions (chronic use) 32 3.9 24 1.9
8 CS plus HCQ: poor adherence 51 6.2 31 2.5
9 Methotrexate: moderate number of prescriptions plus some prescriptions for CS and HCQ 34 4.1 20 1.6
10 Azathioprine: moderate number of prescriptions plus some prescriptions for CS and HCQ 28 3.4 10 0.8
Total   824 100.0 1262 100.0
  1. aPatients who visited a specialist (including a rheumatologist, dermatologist, nephrologist, ophthalmologist, or oncologist) in >50% of SLE-related office visits were defined as primarily seen by specialists. Patients who visited PCPs in >50% of SLE-related office visits were defined as primarily seen by PCPs. The difference in treatment patterns between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.0001).