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Table 1 Survival and characteristics of cancer

From: Treating rheumatic patients with a malignancy

Tumor site European average 5-year survival [63, 64] Tumor category (WHO)a Risk of relapseb [53, 54, 5961] Recurrence rate after transplantation [53, 54, 5961]
Pancreas 5.7% 5 - -
Liver 9.1% 2 - -
Esophagus 11.1% 3 - -
Lung 12.0% 3 - -
Gallbladder and biliary tract 14.4% 5 - -
Brain 19.7%   - -
Stomach 24.5% 3 - -
Multiple myeloma 35.1%   +++ >25%
Ovary and uterine adnexa 36.5% 2 - -
Head and neck 39.5% 3 - -
All leukemias 42.4% 1 and 3 - -
NHL 51.5% 1 + Up to 10%
Colorectal 54.0% 2 ++ 11%-25%
Bone and cartilage 55.5% 3 +++ >25%
Kidney 58.0%   +++ >25%
Soft tissue sarcoma 59.5% 2 +++ >25%
Cervix uteri 62.6% 3 + Up to 10%
Bladder 72.4% 3 +++ >25%
Larynx 62.8% 4   
Corpus uteri 76.2% 3 ++ 11%-25%
Prostate 76.4% 3 ++ 11%-25%
Breast 79.4% 2 ++ 11%-25%
Hodgkin 80.1% 1 + Up to 10%
Melanoma of skin 82.6% 5 +++ >25%
Thyroid 82.9% 5 + Up to 10%
Testis 89.5% 1 + Up to 10%
  1. aCategory 1: These tumors are characterized by their principal curability; that is, the use of single or combination drug therapy will result in the cure of at least some patients. Category 2: For these cancers, the survival is prolonged when adjuvant chemotherapy is used with surgery or radiotherapy in the early stages. Category 3: These are neoplasms, for which there is evidence that the use of a single drug or combination of drugs will cause tumor shrinkage and possibly improve quality of life; survival may be prolonged but this may be of short duration. Category 4: The local control of these malignancies may be improved by the use of chemotherapy before, during, or after surgery or radiotherapy. Category 5: These are tumors for which there are currently no effective drugs. bRisk of relapse is categorized as low (+), intermediate (++), or high (+++). NHL, non-Hodgkin lymphoma; WHO, World Health Organization.